Buderim Garden Club

Buderim Garden Club

Photography Results

2016  Winners


1st Elizabeth Hales

2nd Helen Wallace

3rd Patricia James

March 2017 Winners


Section A: 

1st Elizabeth Hales

2nd Patricia James

3rd. Elizabeth Hales


Section B. 

1st Elizabeth Hales

2nd Elizabeth Hales

3rd Helen Wallace


April 2017 Winners


Section A. Orchids 


1st Elaine Davidson Beautiful photo, nice lighting, flower sharp, well captured.

2nd Patricia Moses Lovely photo, nice lighting, good depth of field delivering a very blurred background, which enhances the orchid.

3rd Helen Wallace Another beautiful orchid, well captured, lovely depth of field, Possibly a little cropping to enhance the flower.

Highly commeded. Patricia Moses Another beautiful orchid, well captured. Lovely lighting and depth of field isolating the flower.


Section B. Art in the Garden

1st. Helen Wallace A very appealing photo incorporating natures art in the form of the wonderful texture of the grandfathers beard.

2nd Monika Stinton Natures art in the garden at its finest. A beautfiul toadstool with the frilly pleated texture. Lighting is good and sharp.

3rd Paul Moses A different interpretation of Art in the Garden. Well seen. This could have been higher in places had the chain been shown.

Highly Commended.

141A: A wonderful example of Art in the Garden. Had the photo been cropped, removing the electricity box and the handing pot on the left hand side, it would have been higher in the placings. The lighting on the watering can is lovely.


Judges Comments

Thank you for another wonderful selection of photos to judge. Many members have thought outside the box and it is lovely to see the different interpretations of Art in the garden.
to get the best out of your photos early morning and late afternoon are the best times to shoot as midday has too much harsh light.
When photographing flowers, using a tripod is a good idea especially for those of us with shaky hands and choosing a time when there is no wind, otherwise a blurry photo is guaranteed.
If you have harsh light you can reduce that effect on your photo by either using your flash or you can hold up a piece of paper between the sun and your subject to help soften the light.
Remove any dead blossoms, twigs or other objects that will detract from your subject.
By changing your position in most cases you can get a much more appealing photo rather than taking the subject front on. Don't be afraid to get down low and take the subject looking up.
Good composition is the key.
Try and get an uncluttered background. There were a couple of photos with wonderful subject matter, but the backgrounds were very cluttered making it hard to focus on the subject.
Don't be afraid to crop your photo to get rid of any distractions. In many of the modern cameras you can do this in the camera, otherwise do it in your photo processing program on your computer. 
Many of the modern cameras have wonderful modes to us if you are not into manual settings, so give them a try. Many have a macro mode which is great for getting that close view of a flower

May Winners
Flowers From Exotic shrubs
FirstPatricia James- Nice placement of flower, sharp, good depth field. Item in the left hand corner could have been cropped out.
Second- Karen O'Connor- lovely flower specimen, good depth of field. Would have been better with central flower on head in focus.
Third- Helen Wallace- good composition and depth of field.
Arches
FirstElaine Davidson- a lovely ornamental arch, however focus does tend to go towards the ball art.
Second- Paul Moses- a lovely shaped arch formed by the creeper. Cropping the photo to get rid of the right hand distraction and sky, to just concentrate on the large shrub would help draw the eye towards the arch more
Third - Pat Moses- a very appealing photo, although still not an arch.

Judges Comments 

A nice selection of flowers from exotic shrubs.

Most photos have nice composition and lighting, but at least four photos are slightly out of focus. As judges we realize you are not professional photographers, however if entering a competition sharp focus of the main area of interest is a must.  Use a tripod or a small step ladder (when at Home) upon which to rest the camera if your hands are unsteady.

Be careful when cropping a small item from a large photo, as inevitably the small item will become pixilated and not sharp

Remove dead flower heads or foliage as they detract from the overall subject.

When taking close ups of flowers, sometimes it is better to allow a bit more distance between the camera and the subject to get a better focus. Always ensure your green focus square is on your subject.


Arches

Some lovely images submitted, however almost half were not of an arch. Most were an Arbor or a pergola

The definition of an arch is a curved symmetrical structure spanning an opening.

When photographing your subject be wary of other items or people that can detract from the main subject.

If you enter 2 photos it is in your best interests to have 2 different subjects.


Congratulations to all entrants